Welcome to New Zealand!

There is no better place to visit than New Zealand! It is not the most accessible place in the world to visit, yet remains undoubtedly one of the most spectacular places on earth! A range of breathtaking scenery from subtropical forests, beaches and offshore islands in the north to glaciers, lakes, hot springs, snow covered mountains and large flat plains in the South –  A diversity like no other place on earth!

New Zealand is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses – the North Island and the South Island and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 1,500 kilometres east of Australia across the Tasman Sea.

QUICK FACTS

Official Name:New Zealand
Capital:Wellington
Location:New Zealand is situated some 1,500 kilometres east of Australia across the Tasman Sea.
Government:Unitary parliamentary representative democracy under constitutional monarchy
Dialing Code:+64
Time Zone:GMT +13.00
Climate Weather:The general climate is mild and temperate however areas in the far north experience warm subtropical temperatures while the far south is much cooler
Population:4.8 million
Land Area:268,021 km2
Official Language:English
Currency:New Zealand Dollar (NZD) $
Foreign Currency Accepted:USD ($), EURO (€), GBP (£) and other major currencies and traveller’s cheques
Entry requirement:17 countries of the EU including France do not require a visa to enter New Zealand for up to 90 days and the UK up to 06 months. Indonesia citizens do not require a visa to enter New Zealand up to 30 days.
You will need a passport with at least two blank pages valid for at least six months beyond the date of your arrival in New Zealand. If your passport does not meet these requirements, you will be denied entry into New Zealand.

All visitors must hold a passport with at least two blank pages valid for at least 06 months beyond the date of your arrival. If your passport does not meet these requirements, you will be denied entry.

Don’t do:Certain medications such as antibiotics and contraceptive pills are only given on prescriptions. If you take regular medications, bring an adequate supply and details of the generic name, as brand names differ country-to-country.

General Information

Few destinations boast so many staggering natural wonders packed into such a small area. Snow-capped peaks, sparkling coves, coastal glaciers, rainforests, fjords, and fish-filled rivers are some of the treasures travellers can explore. New Zealand is a hotspot for exiting sports. White water rafting, luging, jet boating, heli-skiing, skydiving, and mountain biking round out the list of outdoor adventures and the country is home to one of the highest bungee jumps in the world!

New Zealand is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island and the South Island and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 1,500 kilometres east of Australia across the Tasman Sea. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life.

New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy under England and while the Queen is the head of state, it is effectively governs itself through its parliamentary system with a Prime Minister.

It has a population around 4.8 million, while the land masses of the North Island and South Island are similar, approximately two thirds of the population lives in the North Island and the remainder in the South Island.

New Zealand’s capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Time deference

GMT +13:00

Compare to Indonesia
Indonesia is 6:0 hours behind of New Zealand.
When it is 03:00pm in Auckland, New Zealand it is 09:00am in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Compare to France
France is 12:0 hours behind of New Zealand.
When it is 09:00pm in Auckland, New Zealand, it is 09:00am in Paris, France.

Please note that Daylight Saving Time (DST) / Summer Time is taken into account for the calculation of hour difference.

When to visit

There is never a bad time to go to New Zealand.
The general climate is mild and temperate however areas in the far north experience warm subtropical temperatures while the far south is much cooler.
The average New Zealand temperature decreases as you travel south.
January and February are the warmest months, and July is the coldest month of the year.

Summer (December, January, February)
By far the most popular time to take your journey.
With average high temperatures ranging from 21C to 25C, summer in New Zealand is hot without being muggy. Sunshine hours are high and rain is not overly common in most places.

Autumn (March, April, May)
New Zealand looks gorgeous and it’s one of the best times to plan your New Zealand vacation too. Long, sunny days tend to linger long into New Zealand’s autumn, and with average high temperatures of between 18C and 25C.
One of the most special things about Autumn in New Zealand is the colours – especially in the Hawke’s Bay and Central Otago regions.

Winter (June, July, August)
Have you ever taken a snow skiing vacation in July?
While winter months do bring cooler weather and rain to parts of the country, many locations only experience a mild winter. High temperatures range from between 6C – 10C.  In the South Island, frosts and heavy snowfall is common – ski season is world-class.

Spring (September, October, November)
This is the perfect time to take in the beauty of Lake Tekapo in South Island with wonderful spring colours.
Average daytime temperatures during spring range between 19C in the north to 16C in the south. Expect a mixture of weather – crisp, sunny days can change to cooler temperatures with spring showers.

Money and Currency

US$1 = NZD 1.42 (currency rate may vary depending on the day you check)
NZD 1 = IDR 9513
The New Zealand dollar (sign: $, code: NZD) is the currency and legal tender of New Zealand.
100 cents = 1NZ $.
Bank notes: $5, $10, $20, $50, $100
Coins: 10c, 20c, 50c, $1, $2

The New Zealand dollar is consistently one of the 10 most-traded currencies in the world.

Banks in New Zealand

New Zealand’s banking system is modern and highly developed. There are currently 24 registered banks operating in the country. Because it’s so close to Australia, Australian-owned banks dominate New Zealand’s banking industry. The four largest banks in the country – ANZ, Westpac New Zealand, ASB and the Bank of New Zealand are all wholly owned by Australian banks.

Banks in New Zealand typically open on weekdays between 9:00am and 4:30pm.
Not all bank branches are open over the weekend, so you should plan ahead or risk being left short of cash.

Currency Exchange

Most major currencies can be easily exchanged, as long as your money is clean and undamaged. Airports and hotels usually offer the worst exchange rates and charge the highest fees. Banks and foreign exchange kiosks are only slightly better. Your best bet is to withdraw money from an ATM.

Traveller’s Cheques

Most banks in New Zealand cash travellers’ cheques provided you present them with suitable proof of ID (your passport should work fine).

Credit cards

New Zealanders love paying by card even if it’s just for their morning coffee or a newspaper. As a result, credit and debit cards are widely accepted. Restaurants, hotels and even smaller shops take most major credit and debit cards, including Visa, MasterCard and AmEx.
ATMs are plentiful in New Zealand. Most machines in the country accept Cirrus and Maestro (MasterCard), Visa (Plus) and AmEx.

Electricity

The electricity sector in New Zealand uses mainly renewable energy sources such as hydropower, geothermal power and increasingly wind energy.
In New Zealand the power sockets are of type I. The standard voltage is 230 V and the standard frequency is 50 Hz.
Most hotels and motels provide 110-volt ac sockets (rated at 20 watts) for electric razors only. For all other equipment, an adapter/converter is necessary, unless the item has a multi-voltage option.

Telephone and how to call

New Zealand country code is +64
Fixed – 8 digits
Auckland – +64-9
Christchurch – +64-3
Hamilton –+64-7
Wellington – +69-4

If you’re looking to stay connected to the internet and phone services everywhere you go, it’s recommended that you purchase a plan from one of New Zealand’s main networks. Note that mobile coverage is not available in some rural and wilderness areas. Mobile telephone services are provided by Spark, Vodafone and 2degrees, although a number of smaller mobile virtual network operators also exist.
Free WiFi hotspots are found predominantly in urban areas and are not common in small towns or rural regions.

Visa requirement

17 countries of the EU including France do not require a visa to enter New Zealand for up to 90 days and the UK up to 06 months.
Indonesian citizens do not require a visa to enter New Zealand up to 30 days.

By virtue of the Trans-Tasman Travel Arrangement Australian citizens and PR holders are granted a Special Category Visa on arrival in New Zealand, which permits residence and work for an indefinite period and vise versa.
You will need a passport with at least two blank pages valid for at least six months beyond the date of your arrival in New Zealand. If your passport does not meet these requirements, you will be denied entry into New Zealand.

Vaccines and Travel insurance

New Zealand health care is of a high international standard. No vaccinations are required to enter New Zealand. Once in the country you’ll find the tap water is safe to drink.
New Zealand is one of the safest travel destinations in the world, and the absence of poisonous snakes or other dangerous animals makes outdoor adventures here less risky, however you should always observe the same precautions with your personal safety and belongings as you would in any other country or at home.

Certain medications such as antibiotics and contraceptive pills are only given on prescriptions. If you take regular medications, bring an adequate supply and details of the generic name, as brand names differ country-to-country.
Travel insurance can cover you for all sorts of mishaps during your travel, and even before you leave.

How to go to New Zealand

New Zealand to Indonesia
Distance between New Zealand and Indonesia is 7550 Kilo Metres.
Flight between Jakarta and Auckland takes close to 09 hours 48 minutes.

Airlines operated from Indonesia to New Zealand
Qantas, Singapore Airlines, Malaysian Airlines, All Nippon, Asiana, Garuda & Air New Zealand

France to Indonesia
Distance between France and New Zealand is 18,537 Kilo Metres.
Flight between Paris, France to Auckland, New Zealand could take up to 23 hours 32 minutes.

Airlines operated from Paris to New Zealand
Air France, Japan Air lines, Air New Zealand, Thai & Korean Air

Transportation in New Zealand

New Zealand transport offers travellers a large selection of quality private and public transport options.

Buses

Buses are the most common form of public transport available for travelling in New Zealand. The main towns and places in between are served by a network of reasonably priced and modern bus lines, The national bus network (Intercity) has some interesting hop on and off options. You can book tickets online.

Train

Trains are not a common form of public transport in New Zealand. However, there are three main train lines operated by KiwiRail. Out of these 3, Christchurch to the Greymouth, West Coast (the TranzAlpine) considered one of the most scenic rail journeys in the world). Other lines run between Auckland and Weliington (the Overlander) and between Picton and Christchurch (the Tranzcoastal)

Flights

This is a very popular, cheap and fast way to see different parts of New Zealand. Most larger towns in New Zealand have domestic flights to either Auckland, Wellington or Christchurch. Prices are varied depending on the destination you travel.
Air New Zealand and Jetstar are the main providers. Their services are complemented by regional airlines, charter companies and scenic flight operators.

Ferry

Ferries are popular for travel between the North and South Islands. The two major providers are Interislander and Bluebridge. Taking a ferry in New Zealand is a scenic journey to different coastal areas. Ferry travel is also available between the mainland and New Zealand’s offshore islands, including Waiheke, Rangitoto and Great Barrier near Auckland city, and Stewart Island just below the South Island.
Water taxis are smaller vessels offer a scheduled service visiting the small ports, which ferries can’t reach.

Rental cars

Visitors to New Zealand can hire a vehicle as long as they have a current and valid driver licence.  A Self-drive is a popular way to explore New Zealand. Roads are well maintained and signposted and with spectacular scenery.
Rental car companies in New Zealand offer a wide range of vehicles available to suit any budget.
There are depots in the main cities as well as in most of the regional airports throughout the country. One-way hire is easy to organise. Make sure your travel insurance covers rental car hire.

Motorbike

New Zealand is a fantastic place for bikers with gorgeous scenery and not too much traffic.

Special Food and Drinks

New Zealand is a diverse British-based cuisine, with Mediterranean and Pacific Rim influences as the country becomes more cosmopolitan. If you go to any of the larger cities (like Wellington and Auckland), you can also expect to find a heavy Asian influence.
It’s cuisine is largely driven by local ingredients and seasonal variations. The consumption of fish has traditionally been low as meat has been the main preference for meals. Having said this, fish and seafood has always been significant in the Maori diet and you will notice that the names of many of them are still used today in Maori.
In New Zealand households, dinner is the main meal of the day, when families gather and share their evening together.

Vegemite/Marmite

Vegemite (the Australian brand) is more well known, but Marmite (the British and New Zealand version) is basically the same thing. In Australia and New Zealand, it’s all the rage to eat on top of your morning toast.

Cereals

Weet-bix is the most typical breakfast cereal in New Zealand that all local kids seem to eat. It is made from flakes of wheat compacted into little brick shapes.

Hot Pies

Hot pies are a small pastry with a filling of meat, often eating as a snack or at lunchtime.

Lamb/Mutton

You can find lamb and mutton on just about every menu. Most of it is fresh and New Zealand-raised.

Fergburger

It is one of the biggest, most delicious sandwiches and burgers you will ever taste. It is made with New Zealand beef, lettuce, tomato, onion, aioli, and tomato relish.
The menu includes sandwiches with names like “Mr. Big Stuff,” “Little Lamby” and “Bun Laden” (the last of which is a falafel sandwich dressed with lemon yogurt and chipotle chili sauce).

Kumara

It is one of the many root vegetables (sweet potato) popular in Maori culture to be cooked in hangi, or earth ovens.

Hokey-Pokey ice cream

Hokey Pokey is vanilla ice cream with bits of sponge toffee mixed in. Pop into any Tip Top ice cream shop for a scoop. You won’t regret it.

Kiwifruit

Kiwifruit is a New Zealand specialty. The egg-sized fruit with a fuzzy brown skin and (usually) green flesh tastes like no other kind of fruit. If you like the green version, try New Zealand’s Golden Kiwifruit – a sweeter, yellow version of the fruit specially produced in NZ.

New Zealand Wine

New Zealand’s is a great place for wine tourism; no wine-producing country does a better job of welcoming tourists. Today new wineries offer tasting rooms, cafes, restaurants and a warm welcome. New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs may be acknowledged to be among the best in the world.

Lemon and Paeroa (L&P)

Traditionally it was made by mixing lemon juice with carbonated mineral water from the town of Paeroa. Today, it’s manufactured by Coca-Cola.
It is now sold throughout New Zealand and is considered an icon of NZ.

New Zealand Beer

The most common beer to be found in New Zealand are Lion Red, Steinlager, DB, Export Gold, Macs Gold, Waikato, Speights and Tui.

Places to go and things to do

Fiordland National Park and Milford Sound, South Island

A world heritage site, Fiordland National Park protects some of the most spectacular scenery in the country covered with glaciers. These dramatic landscapes carving the famous fjords of Milford, Dusky and Doubtful Sounds. Tourists can explore offshore islands, virgin rainforests, vast lakes and gushing cascades. The park is haven for hikers with some of the countries best walks including famous Milford Track.

Queenstown, South Island

Queenstown in New Zealand’s adventure capital and one of the country’s top destinations for international visitors. It has surrounded by the towering peaks of the Southern Alps, and right on the banks of deep-blue Lake Wakatipu, Queenstown is also an incredibly beautiful spot. You can cycle around the lake’s perimeter or set off on a cruise of the lake’s magnificent waters. There is also a vibrant nightlife with the town’s small central area packed with bars and restaurants.

Fox and Franz Josef Glaciers, South Island

This is among the most accessible glaciers in the world, Franz Josef and Fox glaciers at the main tourist attractions in spectacular Westland Tai Poutini National Park. The glacier is filled by four mountain glaciers that receive about 30 metres of snow each year.  Although glaciers around the world are experiencing shrinkage, Fox and Franz Josef glaciers still continue to flow to the surface of the ocean. A moderate climate at such low altitude means this glacier is one of the most comfortable to visit in the world. You can have light walk by foot and as you stand close to the feet of this glacier, its greatness makes you nothing.

Mount Cook National Park, South Island

Mt Cook, the highest mountain in New Zealand, helped Sir Edmund Hillary develop his climbing skills to conquer Everest. More than 40% of the park is covered in glaciers and the country’s tallest mountain Mount Cook and the longest glacier, The Tasman Glacier lie within the borders making this a top destination for mountaineering. The area has diversity of flora & fauna with more than 40 species of birds and 300 species of Alpine plants.
Here is also the longest New Zealand cycling track, where you can explore the countryside in the national park to the valleys surrounded by natural ice sculptures.

Kaikoura, South Island

Kaikoura is an excellent coastal hike and popular whale watching spot among wild life enthusiasts. In addition to sperm whales and humpbacks, visitors may spot seals, dolphins and a wide variety of birds. It is in between Seaward Kaikoura Range and the Pacific Ocean.

Steward Island (close to South Island)

Stewart Island is the third-largest island of New Zealand and it is found even further south than South Island (30 Kilo metres away from South Island). Most of the island is forested and undeveloped with over 80% of the island is set aside as the Rakiura National Park, giving you the chance to explore the wild side of New Zealand. Most of the pastimes on Stewart Island have to do with the outdoors, including hiking, camping and bird watching.

Lake Taupo and Tongariro National Park, North Island

Tongariro National Park is a World Heritage Site due to its spectacular volcanic features and its importance to the Maori culture. One of the oldest national parks in the world, Tongariro is a land of dramatic beauty with towering volcanoes, turquoise lakes, arid plateaus, alpine meadows, and hot springs. A highlight of the park is the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, one of the most popular day walks in the country.

Rotorua, North Island

Rotorua, is one of the most active geothermal regions in the world. Boiling mud pools, hissing geysers, volcanic craters and steaming thermal springs are common in this dramatic topography. You can take a walk around these geothermal wonders, soak in steaming minerals spring and learn about the local Maori history and culture. Nearby Wai-O-Tapu is also a popular place to visit with many hot springs noted for their colorful appearance, in addition to the Lady Knox Geyser.

Bay of Islands, North Island

A three-hour drive north of Auckland, the beautiful Bay of Islands is one of the most popular vacation destinations in the country. More than 144 islands dot the glittering bay making it a haven for sailing and yachting. Penguins, dolphins, whales, and marlin live in these fertile waters, and the region is a popular sport fishing spot.

Abel Tasman National Park and the Abel Tasman Coast Track, South Island
The Abel Tasman Coast Track in Abel Tasman National Park is one of New Zealand’s Great Walks. Winding along sparkling Tasman Bay, from Marahau to Separation Point, this scenic 51-kilometer hike lies in one of the sunniest regions of the South Island. Along the way, hikers can snorkel in secluded coves; spot fur seals, dolphins, penguins, and a diverse range of birds; hike through cool forests; and enjoy panoramic views from the rugged coastal cliffs.

Auckland, North Island

Auckland is the largest and most populated city in New Zealand. It is located on the North Island, and it is known for its vibrant culture and foodie landscape. For amazing views of this beautiful metropolis, climb the Auckland Harbor Bridge. If you’re interested in learning more about the history and heritage of New Zealand, then be sure to check out the Auckland Domain, which is the city’s oldest part. In the Auckland Domain, you’ll find great exhibits of Maori and Pacific Island artifacts at the iconic Auckland Museum.

Cathedral Cove, Coromandel Peninsula, North Island

It is one of New Zealand’s popular beaches and a marine reserve located on the Coromandel peninsula.
Accessible only on foot or by boat, famous Cathedral Cove is one of the must visit sites on the Coromandel Peninsula.

Waiheke Island (close to North Island)

Waiheke is 45 minutes by ferry from Auckland. With it’s palm trees, white sand beaches and stunning coast, it is the perfect way to experience tropical paradise without venturing too far. Not only island is picaresque but it produces some of the New Zealand’s finest wine which means a wine tasting session is an absolute must. Each vineyard offered something different.

Wellington, North Island

It is the Capital of New Zealand. Wellington is also the hometown of Peter Jackson, Director of Lord of the Rings films.
Any visitor would be delighted with the array of museums, theatres, art-house cinemas, funky boutiques, endless restaurants and hip bars with live bands. For the craft beer enthusiasts, Martinborough Brewery is the place to go whilst in Wellington. The Te Papa Museum in Wellington is New Zealand’s national museum and a ‘must see’ attraction. It is interactive and full of surprises, including an amazing collection of Māori artefacts & natural history.